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The Representative Woman’s Point of View: An Interview with Susan B. Anthony – By Emma Horn Harris, The Saint Paul Globe, May 01, 1904
|| 6/21/2010 || 5:44 pm || + Render A Comment || ||

I came across this article on Chronicling America and thought it would be an interesting addition to my archives. Since I have been adding articles about suffrage in the District of Columbia, I figured it was due time to include an article about Woman’s suffrage, which, as most people know, came into being with the 19th Amendment to the United States Constitution in 1920; a full sixteen years after this article was published.


Scan of The Saint Paul Globe, May 01, 1904

The Representative Woman’s Point of View

Susan B. Anthony Talks of Her Life-Long Efforts in Behalf of Her Sex— Doesn’t Despair Yet of Ultimate Winning of Suffrage Victory — Man’s Life Broader Than Woman’s

By Emma Horn Smith
The Saint Paul Globe, May 01, 1904


You almost feel a reformer yourself when you enter the parlor of Miss Susan B. Anthony’s spotless home; the walls are veritably crowded with pictures of America’s famous reformers– Garrison, Mrs. Stanton and Wendell Phillips, Lucretia Mott and Channing, the Cary sisters, Anna Dickerson and Greeley. And in a corner is a picture of those five famous women who lectured to me centuries ago in the university at Bologna. The one with the veiled head was so beautiful that her face was always covered that men might know her wisdom.

In an upper room, before the fire of her quiet study, you find Miss Anthony herself. You think of the tranquility of Whistler’s portrait of his mother, as she insists that you take her own high-backed chair and slips a little footstool under your feet.

You are wondering, after reading her life and finding how continually women failed her and politicians deceived, that she is still an optimist. “You seem to have kept right on believing when it was raining cats and dogs,” you say. “How could you ever do it?”

The Sun Was Shining

“Oh, that was because I knew that the sun was shining and must prevail, no matter what came between,” she replied. “The cause was too just a one for me to believe in anything but its final triumph. The first work was, of course, all propaganda. The idea of women was so new that we had to go up and down the land, and sow and harrow, and be harrowed. We had to create and educate a sentiment for our reform.”

“Didn’t the progress seem more rapid from, say 1848 to 1865, or up to the time when the New York State laws were amended, than it has since?”

“Well” – and Miss Anthony smiled- “I guess if you had done the work, and been through the weariness and stress of it, you wouldn’t have thought it very rapid- no, nor the results of fifty years compared with efforts and earnestness put into it.”

Men Never Worked for Equal Suffrage

“Are the men who are interested in suffrage to-day to be compared to those anti-slavery men who looked for it?”

“Oh, they never really worked for it. They believed in it abstractly, but there was always something else to be done first.”

“Doesn’t it seem strange that we haven’t got more influence with our husbands, fathers, and sons in getting suffrage- they are so willing to give us everything else?”

“Yes, that is just the point. They give us, like to have us ask for, things. We must look pretty, ask prettily. Those women who have too much self-respect to do so are called shrews,” she said, with a twinkle of humor in voice and eyes.

“Just think of the years that we have our sons before they become voters. Why don’t we influence them more?” I asked.

“That is because we have no real power, after all,” Miss Anthony replied. “A boy may think his mother lovely, have the greatest admiration for her character, but when he goes out in the world and sees the respect shown his father’s opinions, even through he drinks, smokes, and swears, he isn’t going to be influenced greatly by what his mother thinks. This father can, if he chooses, help to make and enforce the laws that regulate conduct and shape life. What can his mother do?”

“Do you think men’s lives to-day are really so much broader than those of women?”

“A ditch digger has a broader life than a woman,” was the emphatic answer.

“But, Miss Anthony, he only digs his ditch, comes in contact with one or two of his kind, drinks a little with them perhaps, talks over the political situation after his light, and now and then votes as his is bidden.”

“But don’t you see that even then he comes into more direct relations with life?” she insisted. “The labor and wage question, the tariff, the character of the man who is boss, the liquor laws, all these vital things are talked over and reasoned about by the handful of diggers.”

“Then you don’t think that women’s contact with the grocer, the butcher, the baker, the candlestickmaker, the food question, the money problem, the tariff as it affects the family purse, and our church and charitable connection is real life?”

“Oh, yes, but how can women help or hinder social conditions that they don’t like, and that they know are wrong?”

Club Women and Suffrage

“Here are the federated club women, most of whom believe in suffrage. Why? They find out, for instance, that they want to modify or amend the laws regulating child labor, or some other evil. What can they do? Either wait years for a changed opinion, or go to the law makers, be treated politely and laid on the shelf. They cannot vote, and more than all, they have no constituents. That’s a word our grandmothers didn’t have in their lexicons. Their interests were in their homes and church, and what people called society. But as the interests of women broaden, and they go into business, manage their property, and study civic questions, they find that they have special interests to protect and special wrongs to remedy.

“Then they realize the disadvantage of having no political influence. They discover to their surprise that politics concerns them. Do you know that since the Federation of Clubs was organized in 1890 it has applied to more legislatures to secure the passage of bills than has the Suffrage Association?”

“You surely think club life broadening, Miss Anthony?”

“That depends on the woman, the questions she is interested in, and the thought she gives to them.”

“Are young men and women interested in woman suffrage?”

“I should say they are. Every few days high school boys and girls, and college men and women, and others send to me for statistics and arguments to be used in their debating societies.”

I asked Miss Anthony if she had a message to send to the young women of the country who are interested in suffrage- a word of advice, perhaps of caution.”

The Lady, Not the Tiger

“A word of advice?” she repeated, smilingly. “Why, there never yet was a young woman who did not feel that if she had had the management of the work from the beginning of the cause, she would have carried it long ago. I felt just so when I was young.”

“Annie Nathan Meyers seems to think woman in politics a question of the Lady or the Tiger. Which do you think it will be?”

“The Lady, beyond doubt,” said Miss Anthony, emphatically, as she closed the interview.



Statehood for the District of Columbia – The Minneapolis Star and Tribune, June 27th, 1987
|| 10/6/2009 || 9:21 am || + Render A Comment || ||

Statehood for the District of Columbia

The Minneapolis Star and Tribune, June 27, 1987

Walter Fauntroy, nonvoting delegate who represents Washington, D.C., in the House, seeks to transform the District of Columbia into the state of New Columbia. Fauntroy’s quest is a long shot, despite support from such prominent Democrats as House Speaker Jim Wright and Majority Leader Tom Foley. Yet he deserves to succeed because his cause is just.

In the past two decades, district residents have been granted home rule and the right to vote in presidential elections. But they still lack representation in Congress. In 1978, Congress offered for ratification a constitutional amendment that would have provided congressional representation but stopped short of statehood. When the seven-year limit on ratification expired in 1985, only a few states had approved the amendment. Minnesota was one of them. With the failure of the 1978 amendment, Fauntroy offered his statehood proposal, which requires only congressional approval and presidential signature.

Like all other U.S. citizens, district residents honor U.S. laws, pay U.S. taxes and serve in the U.S. military. Unlike other U.S. citizens, they have no direct say in what laws Congress will pass, what taxes Congress will impose and what wars Congress will declare. Fauntroy seeks to redress that fundamental unfairness.

There are also practical reasons for granting statehood. Like many core urban areas, the district has suffered a declining population, loss of commercial and industrial tax base to surrounding suburbs and increased poverty. Costs grow faster than city resources. Most states, recognizing the vital role central cities play in metropolitan economies, respond with urban aid raised by taxing suburbs–or by giving core cities the power to impose a payroll tax on suburban commuters.

But Washington has no state government to help out; its suburbs are in Virginia and Maryland. And the district charter prohibits a payroll tax. Which leaves only Congress to finance the rising cost of district Government. And that means Minnesota taxpayers shoulder as much of the district’s financial burden as those in Virginia and Maryland, who benefit directly from the district’s government-dominated economy.

Federal support will always be appropriate, given the government’s enormous tax-exempt holdings in the district. But statehood would allow Washington to tax commuters or work out other arrangements requiring Virginia and Maryland to bear a larger share of the district’s burdens.

Fauntroy’s bill is likely to come to the House floor this fall. Because the district is Democratic, urban and black, it faces opposition from Republicans, rural legislators and bigots. None relish adding district representatives to Congress. Such crass partisanship and bigotry should not be allowed to subvert the drive for statehood. To ease the district’s financial burden and to erase an embarrassing political injustice, Congress should pass the statehood bill and welcome New Columbia to the Union.


This newspaper article was obtained from the Congressional Record in the Library of Congress related to H.R. 51, The New Columbia Admission Act of 1993. The article is not in the public domain but is being republished here under the fair use doctrine of U.S. copyright law in order to continue my advocacy for full representation for the American citizens of the District of Columbia.



Saint Paul Quilt
|| 9/29/2008 || 11:42 am || Comments Off on Saint Paul Quilt || ||

: rendered at 18,000 X 12,000 :
Saint Paul Quilt

It’s been quite a long time since I’ve made one of my signature quilt projection maps. On one hand I haven’t been inspired lately to make any new maps based on this technique. On the other hand, there are only a few American cities that I have yet to map, and Saint Paul, Minnesota was one of them. I was originally going to make this map during the Republican National Convention, but was sidetracked due to other work. Unlike the previous quilt projection maps that I have made most recently, which involved at least one recursive tessellation, this map employs the original style of my hexagon quilts.

This coming Saturday I will be in New York City for the New York Map Society’s monthly meeting. In preparation for my talk, I don’t expect to be blogging much this week because I intend on spending much of my spare time preparing my notes for the talk. If you are in New York, I hope you can make it!

View the Google Map of downtown Saint Paul, Minnesota.

: detail :

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Protest videos from the first day of the RNC in St. Paul, Minnesota
|| 9/2/2008 || 3:25 pm || Comments Off on Protest videos from the first day of the RNC in St. Paul, Minnesota || ||

Below are a selection of videos from yesterday:



Amy Goodman of Democracy Now! is illegally arrested

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I-35W Bridge Quilt #2
|| 8/4/2007 || 10:32 am || Comments Off on I-35W Bridge Quilt #2 || ||

: rendered at 18,000 X 12,000 :

On August 1st the bridge in this map unexpected collapsed killing and injuring scores of people. Having family living in the Twin City area, I took notice of this bridge’s collapse and decided to make a map.

View the Google Map of the Interstate 35W bridge in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

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“Ghost Cars” on the I-35W Bridge
|| 8/3/2007 || 12:11 pm || 2 Comments Rendered || ||

When preparing the imagery for the previous map, I zoomed into the bridge and discovered that there are some “ghost cars” on the bridge.

There is really nothing supernatural about these cars, rather I believe they were created by one of two processes. The photographic artifacts were created by the cars driving at high speeds across the bridge when the photograph was taken. Or they could also be artifcats created by the blending of two different aerial photographs taken at different times. My best guess goes with the first, but I wouldn’t doubt if it were a combination of both. Regardless, they give the map a unique quaity that I wasn’t expecting. I am going to make a fractal version for tomorrow.

View a less pixellated view of the bridge:

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I-35W Bridge Quilt
|| || 11:42 am || Comments Off on I-35W Bridge Quilt || ||

: rendered at 18,000 X 12,000 :

Like the MacArthur Maze Quilt, this map is a prime example of mapping current events. On August 1st the bridge in this map unexpected collapsed killing and injuring scores of people. Having family living in the Twin City area, I took notice of this bridge’s collapse and decided to make a map.

Last year in October I was in the area for my Grandma’s funeral and remember seeing the bridge off in the distance. I even remember being driven across the bridge when I was a lot younger. So unlike most of the maps I’ve made which feature locations I have yet to visit, this one really hits home for me.

View the Google Map of the Interstate 35W bridge in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

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Minneapolis Quilt #2
|| 1/8/2006 || 10:47 am || Comments Off on Minneapolis Quilt #2 || ||

: rendered at 18,000 X 12,000 :
Minneapolis Quilt #2 by Nikolas R. Schiller

I haven’t touched my Minneapolis imagery in a long time and I felt another map was due. I had to remake the source imagery because when I first prepared the imagery for Minneapolis nearly a year ago I did not know about the importance of using perfect squares for tessellations. My first versions were tessellated rectangles- which do tessellate properly, but when placed into Bryce, there is a level of distortion in proportion to the amount the length is larger/smaller than the width. I think the best example of this distortion is found in the first Georgetown Quilts. Well this map is distortion free, errr, well, I didn’t add any of my own at least. The irony is that it all maps are distortions of reality :-)

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Minneapolis Sunrise
|| 8/12/2005 || 8:28 pm || Comments Off on Minneapolis Sunrise || ||

: rendered at 18,000 X 12,000 :

Eh, after 23 hours of processing time, I wish this rendering turned out better. It looks cool, I mean after 3 hours of trying to move around the infinite planes so they’d look right before I set the scene to render, I still am not as happy as I should be with this rendering. I think it boils down to the source imagery itself… I mean, I’ve been really digging the recent Boston imagery, with its acquired/found colorful nature, and this imagery just doesn’t look as cool as what I’ve been making as of late.

Granted the Minneapolis Convention center looks cool the way it reflects, but I guess this rendering simply lacks the variations of color I desire. I could always manipulate the imagery in photoshop a bit more, and maybe I just might start doing this, but I sincerely like the concept of not modifying the colors of the imagery before rendering. By not doing so I can always modify the final product, yet the final product can be influenced by the coloration I do ahead of time…. I’ve been considering doing something similar using black & white imagery, but I haven’t gotten around to it yet….soon…

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The Quilt Project / Minneapolis Quilt
|| 5/2/2005 || 9:39 pm || Comments Off on The Quilt Project / Minneapolis Quilt || ||

I’ve officially started a new series called the “Quilt Project.” It began with “Ivan Memory,” and the second installation of this series is the rendering above. This is the second rendering using downtown Minneapolis as my subject, and I think this version a lot more subtle in it’s features, but more fun to look at.

Similar to the Lenz Project,” the “Quilt Project” has the ability to incorporate all of the aerial and satellite imagery I’ve acquired over the last few years. This technical aspect of this series is not as interesting as the “Star Of #2” series, but I feel these renderings are absolutely gorgeous. They are so simple, yet so visually engaging, they remind me of futuristic tapestries. These next renderings will be Tapestries of the Earth on a micro scale, that revolve around a center focus and are completely symmetrical. In fact, I think would be beautiful to have them printed out on to a cloth fabric and actually make them into rugs. I wonder if someone would purchase an “Earth Tapestry.” I’ll ask around…

Up next, the Netherlands Quilt!

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Nikolas Schiller is a second-class American citizen living in America's last colony, Washington, DC. This blog is my on-line repository of what I have created or found on-line since May of 2004. If you have any questions or comments, please contact:

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