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Wale Versus WALL-E [via youtube doubler]
|| 6/13/2008 || 5:21 pm || Comments Off on Wale Versus WALL-E [via youtube doubler] || ||

click to view the mashup

I downloaded Wale’sMixtape About Nothing” the other day and it occurred to me that Disney has a cartoon coming out that had a similar spelling of the main character. This mashup features Wale’s video called “Uptown Roamers” and on the right is Pixar’s trailer for the upcoming animated feature film called WALL-E. The cartoon’s main character looks a bit too much like Johnny 5 from Short Circuit (1986). I doubt I’ll be seeing the movie, but I’m enjoying Wale‘s newest mixtape.

Click here to download Wale’s “A Mixtape About Nothing”. Click here to read a great review of the mixtape.

View more screen grabs:

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A coded message in the last article from the Washington Post’s Linton Weeks
|| 5/29/2008 || 3:23 pm || Comments Off on A coded message in the last article from the Washington Post’s Linton Weeks || ||

Yesterday I stumbled across this article on Reddit. Its a simple article about John Updike, but it’s also the author’s last article for the Washington Post because the newspaper is laying off / buying out a number of their journalists. As you can see below, Linton Weeks included a cute coded message for his long-time readers:

Updike Reads The Lines in American Art
Jefferson Lecturer Tackles Nation’s Quest for Identity
By Linton Weeks
Washington Post Staff Writer
Saturday, May 24, 2008; Page C07

Give novelist and sometime art critic John Updike credit. The 2008 National Endowment for the Humanities Jefferson Lecturer tried to answer the thorny question: “What is American about American art?”

Onstage at the Warner Theatre Thursday night, in front of 1,900 culture lovers, the angular, silver-haired Updike used more than 60 images, ranging from formal mid-18th-century portraits by Bostonian John Singleton Copley to the hyper-realistic late-20th-century renderings of Richard Estes, to make his point: “The American artist . . . born into a continent without museums and art schools, took nature as his only instructor, and things as his principal study.”

One of the salient traits of this country, he told the gathering, is an urge to define what is American. To delineate the romantic wildness of our nature. To search for a national self-image. That desire to map the New World is reflected in the tight classicist tradition of American art.

Drawing rules in this country’s artwork, Updike said. He quoted a European-trained artist who criticized Copley — the first American to exhibit a painting in Europe — for being too “liney.” That is, too reliant on the drawing in his paintings and not free enough with color and light.

By tracing that harsh “lineyness” in American painting, and juxtaposing it against a freer, more colorful romantic “painterliness” in other work, Updike laid out a convincing answer to his overarching what-is-American question.

Yet he did it subtly. Flashing slides of well-knowns, such as Gilbert Stuart, Winslow Homer, Grant Wood and Norman Rockwell, Updike pointed out the distinctions.

European-influenced artists, such as Homer and John Singer Sargent, tended toward the painterly; more purely American artists, such as Copley and Thomas Hart Benton, toward the liney.

Reading from a text, Updike, 76, spoke in a raspy voice. The presentation moved quickly. An invitation to deliver the Jefferson Lecture is the loftiest award given by the federal government for “distinguished intellectual achievement in the humanities,” and there was a patriotic air to the affair.

Even the U.S. Marine Band showed up to play before the ceremony.

At no point during the speech did Updike, or the slideshow technology, falter. The address was based on “Picturing America,” an NEH initiative to distribute reproductions of American paintings to schools and libraries.

Diversity was nearly absent in Updike’s presentation. The painters he referred to were mostly males of European descent, a cohort he referred to as “that least hip of demographic groups.” He did not, for instance, mention the extraordinary American painter Mary Cassatt, who became an expatriate.

Either ignored or overlooked, as well, was any reference to a 19th-century European debate — similar to the liney-painterly dichotomy — between classicist Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres and romanticist Eugène Delacroix.

Regardless, Updike’s lecture was high-minded and provocative — like most of his work.

Soon after the talk ended, the patrons repaired to the Willard Hotel for a wine-and-sweets reception. So did Updike.

All I can say is: well done and I hope the next job is even better!



Blue Balls [Hexcode T-Shirt Humor]
|| 5/20/2008 || 11:14 am || Comments Off on Blue Balls [Hexcode T-Shirt Humor] || ||

Blue Balls Hexcode T-Shirt Concept

Following up my use of Hexadecimal Color Codes on the #006900 Party t-shirt, which was based off of the #000000 Power t-shirt, I made another t-shirt design: #0000FF (balls)

For the last week or so I’ve been thinking about a way to use a non-color word visually and this morning I came up with balls. They are easy to draw and are easily identifiable. Embedded in the t-shirt is a phallic image that is supposed to further add to the humor of what constitutes blue balls.



Experimenting with Facebook’s advertisement system [part 4 – Fvck Censorship]
|| 5/18/2008 || 3:56 pm || Comments Off on Experimenting with Facebook’s advertisement system [part 4 – Fvck Censorship] || ||

For my last experiment I decided to just screw around with Facebook to see if I can get one by their censors. This experiment involves the use of geeky lexical humor to poke fun of the antiquated way of using the letter V in place of the letter U and to see if I could get a quasi-curse word through their filters.

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#006900 Party [that’s Green Party in Hexadecimal Color Code]
|| 5/11/2008 || 10:07 pm || Comments Off on #006900 Party [that’s Green Party in Hexadecimal Color Code] || ||

Green Party in Hexadecimal Color Code

At the Artomatic opening night I spoke with someone close to Mark Jenkins about his #000000 POWER t-shirt concept that uses Hexadecimal Color Codes to reference the word’s color (aka BLACK POWER). In this geeky context I thought it would be funny to follow-up this meme by making my own HTML-based t-shirt.

After thinking through a bunch of different permutations, I came up with #006900 Party to represent the Green Party of the United States. I could have chosen from quite a few different combinations for the color Green, but I thought that the number 69 was the most widely understood numerical reference out of the possible permutations, with the exception of the number 42, a favorite number of mine that I found to be too dark.

I will be donating this design to the Green Party of the United States if they want to use it for their official merchandise.



the Artomatic Artist Catalog [PWND] – with updates
|| 5/8/2008 || 6:10 pm || Comments Off on the Artomatic Artist Catalog [PWND] – with updates || ||

Artomatic's artist catalog alaphabet hack

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ABSOLUT STATEHOOD
|| 4/8/2008 || 4:52 pm || Comments Off on ABSOLUT STATEHOOD || ||

Screen grab links to .kmz file for Google Earth

A geovisual response to an LA Times blog entry showing mostly isolationist responses to an alternative history map of North America by Absolut Vodka.

This interactive map for Google Earth shows the familiar Absolut Vodka bottle labeled “Absolut Statehood” and placed inside of the original boundaries of the District of Columbia. These boundaries existed until 1847 after the residents of Virginia voted to cede back the portion of the District of Columbia that was west of the Potomac River.

Absolut Statehood represents the cartographic notion that the nation’s capital can become America’s 51st state*. Today there are over 550,000 American citizens living in the nation’s capital that are being denied the fundamental right of representation in Congress. This ongoing human rights violation currently practiced by the government of the United States has been denounced by the United Nations, the Organization of American States, and the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe. The United States is the only country in the industrialized world that forbids the residents of it’s capital city the right to elect representatives to their national legislature.

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Globe Graffiti – Continued
|| || 2:01 pm || Comments Off on Globe Graffiti – Continued || ||

Las month I posted photographs of the aftermath of DEBT tagging my friend’s antique globe that I had once used in an art installation. Today, via DECOY’s blog, I find censored pictures of DEBT in action.

Also, for the visually astute, the painting in the background by DECOY (I believe it’s called “Two Headed Monster”) was used as the cover of the popular book The Beautiful Things That Heaven Bears by Dinaw Mengestu.



Lost in a hairy bush? Use a map! – Or just a razor instead…
|| 3/28/2008 || 1:29 pm || Comments Off on Lost in a hairy bush? Use a map! – Or just a razor instead… || ||

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An anthropomorphic reflection on society
|| || 12:14 pm || Comments Off on An anthropomorphic reflection on society || ||

Or maybe just a cute dog.

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Nikolas Schiller is a second-class American citizen living in America's last colony, Washington, DC. This blog is my on-line repository of what I have created or found on-line since May of 2004. If you have any questions or comments, please contact:

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  • thank you,
    come again!