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Today at Lafayette Park: YouTube Video of the Tibetan National Uprising Day Rally and SEIU’s Employee Free Choice Act rally
|| 3/9/2009 || 11:29 pm || + Render A Comment || ||

I was woken up this morning by a friend calling from Los Angeles. He’d missed his flight and needed someone to do sound for a rally at Lafayette Park (just north of the White House). Happy that it was a beautiful day, I obliged and proceeded to go to his office to pick up the sound system. When we arrived at the park we were greeted by a decent sized demonstration that was taking place on the other side of the park in support of a Free Tibet because the following day, March 10th, is the 50th anniversary of the 1959 Tibetan Uprising. As the Tibetan National Uprising Day Rally ended and the demonstrators started to march toward the Chinese Embassy, I got out my camera and filmed this:


Afterwards we set up the stage and about an hour later the SEUI‘s rally for the Employee Free Choice Act began. I snapped a couple pictures of the masks that were created by local designer Cesar Maxit:


Continue:

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Nixon Sends GIs Into Cambodia And An Inverted 1970 Map of Communist Controlled Laos and Cambodia
|| 3/1/2009 || 8:53 pm || Comments Off on Nixon Sends GIs Into Cambodia And An Inverted 1970 Map of Communist Controlled Laos and Cambodia || ||

The other week I found this flyer in the Library of Congress’ An American Time Capsule: Three Centuries of Broadsides and Other Printed Ephemera. I inverted the colors because the location of the conflict & reason for mobilization are different, but the circumstances remain timely because America currently at war in two countries. I remember going to the White House for a demonstration nearly six years ago the weekend after George Bush invaded Iraq. I have the video that I produced that day somewhere backed up and I plan on uploading to the YouTube this month as a somber reminder. However, I learned six years ago that our government is going to go to war without the consent of the American public and protesting, while important, does little to change the course of events in present-day America. 39 years ago, however, demonstrations were an important part of ending the war in Vietnam. But will they help bring the troops home from Iraq & Afghanistan? Doubtful. Really doubtful.


THE WASHINGTON POST – Friday, May 1, 1970

Nixon Sends GIs Into Cambodia

NIXON DECLARES ALL-OUT WAR ON SOUTHEAST ASIA

THE PEOPLE MUST ACT NOW

MASS MEETING at the WHITE HOUSE at noon on saturday, may 9

In another attempt to stifle dissent, the Nixon administration has handed down regulations prohibiting demonstrations on federal park land without a 15 day advance notice. Public outrage at the invasion of Cambodia is so great we will go to the White House in spite of these regulations. We will assert our right to peacefully assemble. The police may block us. If they also decide to arrest us, we will maintain a militant non-violent discipline, and options will be provided for those not prepared for arrest. Meet us at the White House!

DEMAND IMMEDIATE WITHDRAWAL OF ALL U.S. TROOPS & SUPPLIES FROM SOUTHEAST ASIA

The New Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam — 1029 Vermont Av. N.W. Wash. D.C. 20005


Courtesy of the Library of Congress


Notes:
1) On the transcription page on the Library of Congress website, I found that the map above was improperly cited as an “illustration”
2) I believe the map was probably published in the Washington Post on Friday May 1st, 1970



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YouTube video of DC Colonists demonstrating at the first Nationals game at RFK Stadium
|| 2/18/2009 || 11:38 pm || + Render A Comment || ||

On April 3rd, 2005, a group of DC residents staged a demonstration at the Nationals first exhibition game at RFK stadium. The group bought up a block of seats in the outfield and held up signs spelling out two messages: “Strike 4 DC Statehood” when players would strike out and “Bush Play Ball With DC” when the players would walk.



This video is not new per se, in fact I wrote about it when I first added to the video to my website, however at the time I was avoiding YouTube. Yesterday I decided to fire up the old external hard drive, found this clip in it’s original DV format, and I decided to compress & upload the video to my YouTube account….. and yes, I was the one dressed in “colonial attire” :-)



A short YouTube video from the “Let Gaza Live” demonstration
|| 1/11/2009 || 4:20 pm || Comments Off on A short YouTube video from the “Let Gaza Live” demonstration || ||

This YouTube video contains two short clips. The first video clip was taken in Lafayette Park, located just north of the White House, as the march was just starting. The second video clip was taken about 15 minutes later at the corner of 15th & New York Ave as the march continued its way through the streets of Washington, DC.



A roundup of videos from yesterday’s shoe demonstration outside of the White House
|| 12/18/2008 || 4:07 pm || Comments Off on A roundup of videos from yesterday’s shoe demonstration outside of the White House || ||

This morning I scoured the intertubes for videos related to yesterday’s shoe demonstration outside of the White House. Below are the videos I’ve pulled from YouTube and other media outlets.


DC FOX 5: White House Protestors Throw Shoes at Bush Effigy

The rest of the videos:

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YouTube video of the “Reclaim the Streets” demonstration [Summer 2001]
|| 11/21/2008 || 5:42 pm || Comments Off on YouTube video of the “Reclaim the Streets” demonstration [Summer 2001] || ||


Music: More bit and Pieces by Coldcut

From Wikipedia:

Reclaim the Streets Reclaim the Streets (RTS) is a collective with a shared ideal of community ownership of public spaces. Participants characterize the collective as a resistance movement opposed to the dominance of corporate forces in globalisation, and to the car as the dominant mode of transport.

Since I was being all nostalgic with the Indymedia entry the other day, I decided to post this YouTube video that my friend Robin made. It was filmed in the summer of 2001 and shows the freedoms that protesters enjoyed in Washington, DC before 9/11. While I was out of town in Saint Louis when this took demonstration place, its interesting to see what Dupont Circle and Adams Morgan looked like seven years ago.



The Singapore 18
|| 11/7/2008 || 11:56 am || Comments Off on The Singapore 18 || ||

This morning I received an e-mail from Timothy Cooper announcing that his Op-Ed was published today in the Washington Times (below).

After I read the article, I went on to do my morning IP analysis, and guess who visited my website looking for more information? None other than the Singaporean government. The very same government the Op-Ed was written to agitate. Examples like this prove that we really do live in a small world, while at the same time showing that human rights transcend borders.

COOPER: The Singapore 18

Prosecution or persecution?
Op-Ed by Timothy Cooper
Friday, November 7, 2008

The names Gandhi Ambalam, Chia Ti Lik, Chong Kai Xiong, Jeffrey George, Jaslyn Go, Chee Siok Chin, Govindan Rajan, Chee Soon Juan, Jufrie Mahmood, Jufri Salim, Surayah Akbar, Ng E-Jay, Seelan Palay, Shafi’ie, Carl Lang, John Tan, Francis Yong and Sylvester Lim aren’t exactly household names — but they should be. This week 18 Singaporeans — the Singapore 18 — are standing trial for purported crimes against America’s 11th largest trading partner — Singapore.

Indicted for violating the Miscellaneous Offences Act for assembling peacefully without a permit to register their concerns over escalating housing costs, they claim that they’re innocent by virtue of their right under the Singapore constitution to enjoy the guarantees of freedom of assembly and expression. Historically, however, Singapore has viewed political dissent through a lens darkly, treating protest as a threat to social tranquility and economic prosperity, rather than what it is — a fundamental right and necessity in any democracy.

While Singapore claims to be a constitutional democracy, it nevertheless routinely arrests Singaporeans for attempting to assert those rights articulated under the constitution in the open light of day. A democracy, it’s not quite.

Ironically, while their trial is about their right to public assembly in numbers more than four without a permit, and to free speech, they view it as a test about whether Singapore’s judiciary is independent enough to interpret the country’s constitution objectively. In effect, Judge Chia Wee Kiat, who’s presiding magistrate over the case, is on trial, too. Many Singaporeans will be watching how he rules. Americans should be watching, too.

That’s because Singapore’s Minister for Home Affairs, Wong Kan Seng, appears to refuse to be bound by the affirmative rights guaranteed under the country’s basic law. Last February, he stated that “[w]e have stopped short of allowing outdoor and street demonstration … Our experiences in the past have taught us to be very circumspect about outdoor and street protests.” His reference is to the race riots in Singapore during the 1960s — almost 50 years ago. Which is like saying that because Washington, D.C. experienced race riots in the 1960s, the residents of Washington must be denied the right to protest government policies. That argument simply doesn’t wash.

But the judge in the case will likely rule accordingly, regardless of the plain language of the constitution.

The late Singaporean politician, Joshua Benjamin Jeyaretnam, stated in an interview shortly before his death that his main concern was that the public had the “perception that its judiciary was not independent.” He himself had been made a bankrupt by defamation lawsuits filed against him by his political opponents and the high damages awarded them by Singapore courts. After paying off his debts, he’d recently committed to heading a new political party, whose primary agenda was calling for the independence of the judiciary.

He was not alone. In July, the International Bar Association (ABA) issued a 72-page report on the state of Singapore’s judiciary noting that “there are concerns about the objective and subjective independence and impartiality of Singapore judges.” The report’s final recommendations advocate tenure be granted Singapore judges and that the transfer of judges between “executive and judicial roles” be banned. They also call on the government to prohibit defamation as a criminal offense, and forbid public officials from initiating criminal defamation suits, which detractors claim are used by government to silence its critics.

One of those critics is Chee Soon Juan. He’s been jailed seven times on a potpourri of politically-related charges, including speaking without a permit, contempt of court, and even for attempting to depart Singapore in order to attend an international rights conference. He’s been fined nearly $1 million to date and made bankrupt by defamation suits brought against him by former Prime Ministers Lee Kuan Yew, Goh Chok Tong, and Singapore’s current Minister Mentor, Lee Hsein Loong. In the next few months, he faces six more trials and an indeterminate amount of jail time. Yet all he wants is for the courts to properly enforce the spirit and letter of the Singapore constitution. Barred from leaving the country, he’s been put under country arrest and is a prisoner of conscience.

Were the Singapore 18 living in China or Russia, they’d be enjoying considerable support from the U.S. Instead, they’re victims of a sad neglect. They’ve been cut loose by a nation otherwise preoccupied. But the next Congress and administration should take up the cause of freedom in Singapore. They should exert their influences on Singapore to open up its political space to peaceful dissent and to embrace the benefits of political pluralism. Economic prosperity and political freedoms are not mutually exclusive in Singapore or anywhere else.

Above all, this country should call for judicial reform in Singapore because as J.B. Jeyaretnam would no doubt agree without independence there can be no rule of law.

Timothy Cooper is executive director of the human-rights group Worldrights.



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Iraq Veterans Against the War Concert & March at the 2008 DNC
|| 9/1/2008 || 2:50 pm || Comments Off on Iraq Veterans Against the War Concert & March at the 2008 DNC || ||

Iraq Veterans Against the War Concert & March in Denver from Nikolas Schiller on Vimeo.
Click here to watch on YouTube

The Iraq Veterans Against the War hosted a free concert at the Denver Coliseum with The Coup, Flobots, and Rage Against the Machine. After the sold out show, about 4,000 people took part in a 4 mile march to downtown Denver to give the presidential candidate Barack Obama Campaign a list of demands regarding the war the in Iraq and the treatment of veterans.

This sequential video starts at the Denver Coliseum with clips of the Flobots and Rage Against The Machine, then follows the demonstrators to downtown Denver, and finishes on the Denver police marching like soldiers & a polar bear at Ralph Nader’s “Open The Debates” rally at the University of Denver Magness Arena.

Click here for photographs from the day’s march.

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Democratic National Convention 2008 – Photos from Day Three
|| 8/28/2008 || 11:49 pm || Comments Off on Democratic National Convention 2008 – Photos from Day Three || ||

I was able to secure a ticket to see Barack Obama’s acceptance speech at Invecso Field. Below are the photos I took of the event. I will note that the 5th floor at the stadium did not sell beer, but the lower floors of stadium did. Still unequal…

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Democratic National Convention 2008 – Photos from Day Two
|| 8/27/2008 || 11:44 pm || Comments Off on Democratic National Convention 2008 – Photos from Day Two || ||

The Iraq Veterans Against the War hosted a free concert at the Denver Coliseum with The Coup, Flobots, and Rage Against the Machine. After the sold out show, about 4,000 people took part in a 4 mile march to downtown Denver to give the presidential candidate Barack Obama Campaign a list of demands regarding the war the in Iraq and the treatment of veterans.

Below are the photos I took today:

View the rest of the photographs:

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  • thank you,
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